Award for Personal Licence Holders (APLH) Frequently Asked Questions

What businesses require personal licence holders?
Who is it for?
What activities do I need a personal licence for?
Who can become a personal licence holder?
Where do you offer courses?
Do you run in-house training courses?
What is the Personal Licence Application Service?
Are there any entry requirements for the courses?
What are the benefits?
What is covered on the course?
What qualification do I get?
How is it assessed?

 

What businesses require personal licence holders?

Personal licence holders are required at any businesses that sell alcohol. This includes businesses that sell alcohol for consumption on the premises (bars, pubs etc.) and off the premises (supermarkets, off-licences etc.). Examples of business that require personal licence holders are:

  • Pubs
  • Bars
  • Clubs
  • Restaurants
  • Hotels
  • Licensed cafés
  • Licensed cinemas
  • Off-licences
  • Supermarkets
  • Conference facilities
  • Events companies
  • Catering suppliers 

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Who is it for?

It is for anyone who sells or authorises the sale of alcohol, including:

  • Bartenders
  • Supervisors
  • Managers
  • Landlords
  • Restaurant owners
  • Hoteliers
  • Events' organisers
  • Designated Premises Supervisors (DPS)
  • Those considering a future in hospitality sector.

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What activities do I need a personal licence for?

The law in the UK requires that each sale of alcohol is made or authorised by a personal-licence holder: what this means is that someone who works in a bar, pub, or any venue that sells alcohol, and who holds a personal licence either sells the alcohol themselves or gives permission to someone else who does not hold a personal licence to sell the alcohol.
 
The law also requires that any premises that sell alcohol have an appointed Designated Premises Supervisor (DPS): this is an official appointment, and it must be a person who is a personal licence holder and who is in day-to-day control of the premises, such as a manager or landlord.

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Who can become a personal licence holder?

Anyone who:

  • Has a relevant-licensing qualification, such as the BIIAB Level 2 Award for Personal Licence Holders, for which we run training courses.
  • Is aged 18 years or over
  • Has no relevant unspent criminal convictions or foreign convictions (though, ultimately, this is up to the local-licensing authority to determine whether the person is suitable to be granted a personal licence).
 

Where do you offer courses?

We run training courses at various locations around the country. If we do not currently offer a course near you, please contact us, as it is likely others are interested as well.

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Do you run in-house training courses?

Yes, we offer in-house training courses for the Award for Personal Licence Holders (APLH) and the Award in Responsible Alcohol Retailing. Please contact us to discuss your requirements.

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What is the Personal Licence Application Service?

Before reading, we can do this for you: simply choose the Personal Licence Application Service when booking your course.

Once you have successfully completed the Award for Personal Licence Holders (APLH), you still have to apply for a personal licence from your local authority; your application must include:

  • A personal-licence holder application form
  • The required application fee
  • Your original licensing qualification
  • Two photos, one of which is endorsed as a true likeness by a person of standing in the community
  • A Disclosure Barring Service (DBS) check (formerly known as a CRB check), which must be applied for separately

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Are there any entry requirements for the courses?

No. We do not assume any prior knowledge: a willingness to participate actively is all we ask.

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What are the benefits?

Apart from the legal benefits regarding the sale of alcohol, the following are added benefits of being a personal licence holder:

  • Portability

Your personal licence is not tied to a specific premises or role: you are free to work anywhere in England, Wales or the Scilly Isles.

  • More Temporary Event Notices

As a personal licence holder, you are able to give more temporary-event notices: this allows you greater flexibility with your business should you need to hold a temporary event, one that is not included in your premises licence, or hold a function that you are not currently licensed to hold. You are also allowed to give more late-temporary-event notices.

  • Professional Development

If you are considering a future in the hospitality sector, being a personal-licence holder will make you an attractive candidate: legally, you are able to sell alcohol, but, more importantly, you are able to authorise others who are not personal licence holders to sell alcohol. This makes you more likely to find work should you need to, and it also makes you more likely to be promoted to a senior position, such as bar manager; these positions could eventually lead on to roles such as Area or Region Manager. As a personal licence is not tied to a specific premises or area, you are able to move into different geographic areas and different areas within the hospitality sector.

  • Entrepreneurship

If you are considering starting your own business, such as a pub, club, bar, restaurant, licensed cafe or even an events company, you will need a personal licence, and having this already could save you months of preparation and waiting around.

  • Increased knowledge, confidence and authority

As a personal licence holder you may be requested by your employer to run staff inductions and internal-staff training; Our Award for Personal Licence Holders training course will not just provide you with all the factual information relevant to licensing law and best practice, it will also develop your confidence to direct yourself and others.

  • Employers' Peace-of-Mind

Well-trained members of staff are less likely to make mistakes and are more likely to anticipate and deal with potential problems before they become significant headaches, which may be costly, time-consuming and stressful.

Training members of staff in licensing law and best practice also demonstrates to the responsible authorities, such as the Weights-and-Measures Authority, Local Licensing Authority and Police, that you are a responsible employer; should any problems arise, this may also demonstrate due-diligence: that you, the employer, has taken all reasonable steps to ensure a mistake is not made.

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What is covered on the course?

Licensing authorities:
Their roles, responsibilities and functions within the framework of the licensing objectives

Personal licences:
The application process and legal duties when applying for a personal licence
The role and legal duties of a personal licence holder
The penalties for failure to comply with the law
    
Premises licences:
The law in relation to premises licences
The content and purpose of the Operating Schedule
    
Temporary Event Notices:
The application process for a Temporary Event Notices
The law in relation to Temporary Event Notices

Responsible persons:
Their duties and rights in relation to licensed premises

The police and other responsible authorities:
Their powers with regards to the suspension and closure of licensed premises
Their rights of entry to licensed premises

The protection of children from harm on licensed premises

Alcohol:
The nature and strength of alcoholic drinks
The affect of alcohol on the body

Prohibitions and exemptions in relation to licensable activities

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What qualification do I get?

On successful completion of the course, you will be awarded the BIIAB Level 2 Award for Personal Licence Holders (APLH).This is a government-approved certification and is accredited on the Qualification and Credit Framework (QCF) at Level 2 with a credit value of 1 (Accreditation Number: 501/1494/3).

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How is it assessed?

At the end of the training day, candidates  will sit a 40 question multiple-choice examination, which lasts 40 minutes. To pass the exam, candidates must correctly answer 28 out of 40 questions (70%).

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